Sunday, February 22, 2009

Did you Know? The Difference Between Croissant Shapes



Some plain croissants are straight, and some are joined together at the ends in a sort of crescent moon shape. I never knew that this actually meant something. I thought the shape of the croissant was simply the preference of the person who had shaped them.

What I learned recently is that the shape of the croissant - straight across or crescent moon, reflects the ingredients inside... in France at least. In France, it is the law, that only a croissant made with pure butter can be straight. If a croissant is made with any other sort of fat, for example, margarine, it must be joined at the ends to form a crescent moon shape.

The next time you buy a croissant, you might be a little more inquisitive about what it's made of...

17 comments:

from my motorhome to yours said...

wow these look great,pam

Takeaways said...

How interesting, I never knew that and have been to France so many times!!

Christina Kim said...

I learned of your blog through my friend Kat Burchell (through Mt. Holyoke), and I just started food blogging! I love your blog; I will be sure to keep up.

jack said...

interesting little croissant tidbit. i'd love to know what the penalty is for breaking that law.

onno david said...

Just found your blog today it's wonderful. I just reading this blog nice very nice. Your explanation was very easy to read and understand. Very intrinsic and technically perfect.

Green said...

I never known before that the shape of Croissant actually reflect the ingredient in it. This is very helpful.

Thank you so much for posting this.

See you next post.

-Green
www.ahacook.com

Oven Recipes said...

That was a real enlightenment!
Thanks a lot for the information...

Florence Craye said...

I did NOT know that! Cool!

Timothee said...

Isn't that the other way around?

"Croissant" means "crescent" (as you can guess), and to me (I'm French FYI), the good ones tend to be the ones in a… crescent shape.

My point is that croissants have been around for a long long time and they're called "croissants" because of their crescent shape. But making them without pure butter is fairly new. So, if a law exists on the matter, I'd imagine that only the pure butter one can have the crescent shape.

Timothee said...

Ok, I got confirmation from one of my friends who is a French bakery chef, and you're right: the straight one is the one with pure butter.

The curved ones tend to have margarine or something like that.

Two other pieces of info: he works in the US and tried to make croissants straight, explaining that in France the good ones are straight, but customers and hotels wanted them curved :) ; in France at least, the pure butter ones are actually less popular than the regular ones, sometimes to a ratio of 10:1.

Cheers!

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Anonymous said...

It is useful to try everything in practise anyway and I like that here it's always possible to find something new. :)

Anonymous said...

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Jessica Starkes said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
jescloresia said...

I read this fact on the back of a pastry bag from Starbucks, so I had to Google it to make sure and that's when I came across your blog; seems great. Thank you.

Hari Riya said...

wonderful....
yummyyyy....
it's looking soooo goood...

Geoffrey said...

The best croissants I ever saw were in a shop in Hamilton, Bermuda. They were huge, in a circle of diameter the length of a man's hand.
By the way, how can a straight pastry be a croissant? It's no crescent, that's for sure!